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Bulletin | Covid-19

Weekend Workplace Wrap-up on COVID-19 for July 24 to 26, 2020

Fasken
Reading Time 4 minute read
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Labour, Employment & Human Rights Bulletin

Below are the key government announcements made on July 24 to 26, 2020 that touch on workplace issues. Our daily (weekday) and weekend overviews of previous government announcements, employment analyses and other COVID-19 information are available here

The Federal Government

There were no major government updates as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

Alberta

There were no major government updates as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

British Columbia

The Provincial Health Officer has issued an order requiring food service establishments, liquor service establishments, and event hosts to comply with updated rules regarding occupancy limits, physical distancing, use of physical barriers, seating, prohibited activities, and event logistics. The new rules include:

  • Requiring all patrons to be seated;
  • Prohibiting patrons from dancing or singing;
  • Banning alcohol self-service (ordering from the bar); and
  • Implementing measures to reduce line-ups, gatherings, and pressure points.

WorkSafeBC's Return to Work Protocols for Restaurants, Cafes, Pubs, and Nightclubs have been updated to reflect the new order by the Provincial Heath Officer.

Manitoba

There were no major government updates as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

New Brunswick

There were no major government updates as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

Newfoundland and Labrador

There were no major government updates as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

Nova Scotia

The province announced that face masks will be mandatory in most indoor public places beginning July 31, 2020. Indoor public places include, among other things:

  • Retail businesses;
  • Shopping centres;
  • Personal services businesses such as hair and nail salons, restaurants and bars, except while people are eating or drinking;
  • Places of worship or faith gatherings;
  • Places for cultural or entertainment services or activities such as movie theatres, and places for sports and recreational activities such as a gym, pool or indoor tennis facility, except while doing an activity where a mask cannot be worn;
  • Places for events such as conferences and receptions;
  • Municipal or provincial government locations offering services to the public;
  • Common areas of tourist accommodations such as lobbies, elevators and hallways;
  • Common areas of office buildings such as lobbies, elevators and hallways, but not private offices;
  • Public areas of a university or college campus, such as a library or student union building, but not classrooms, labs, offices or residences; and
  • Train or bus stations, ferry terminals and airports.

Children under the age of two are exempt from this mandate, as well as children aged two to four when their caregiver cannot get them to wear a mask. People with a valid medical reason for not wearing a mask are also exempt.

Ontario

There were no major government updates as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

Prince Edward Island

On July 25, 2020, the Ticket Regulations (EC58/08) pursuant to the Summary Proceedings Act came into force. Regulations EC58/08 institute fines for individuals and corporations or directors who violate, among other things, orders from health officials or the Chief Public Health Officer.

Some offences include:

  • Failure of a medical or nurse practitioner or a person in charge of an institution to report to the Chief Public Health Officer that a person has or may have a notifiable disease, such as COVID-19;
  • Failure of an administrator to report to the Chief Public Health Officer an outbreak of a communicable disease, such as COVID-19, in a health facility;
  • Failure of a school principal or operator of child care facility to report to the Chief Public Health Officer that a student or child has or may have a notifiable disease, such as COVID-19; or
  • Knowingly providing false or misleading information, orally or in writing, to a public health official.

The fines ranges from $1,000 to $10,000 for individuals and $5,000 to $25,000 for corporations or directors depending on whether the offence is a first, second, third, or subsequent offence.

Quebec

Effective July 27, 2020, individuals using shared transportation services (including bus, subway, train, and plane, among others), are required to wear a face covering. Exceptions to this requirement include those under 12 years of age and a person who states that the wearing of the face covering is not possible because of a medical condition. The face covering may be removed momentarily to eat or drink or for identification purposes. The same requirements and exceptions apply for motor vehicles used for remunerated passenger transportation. 

Saskatchewan

The government announced that effective July 24, 2020, businesses and services in the northwest can proceed in accordance with the restrictions and guidance in phase 4 of the Re-Open Saskatchewan plan.

Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and the Yukon

In Yukon, the government released health and safety guidelines for schools and school buses, and announced that it will release school operation plans by August 12, 2020.

In Nunavut, the government released its "2020-21 Opening Plan for Nunavut School: Health and Safety", and announced that schools will reopen with no physical distancing measures, provided that no case of COVID-19 is reported in the territory.

There were no major government updates in the Northwest Territories as of 5:00 p.m. E.D.T. on July 26, 2020.

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